Recent Posts

How to Install a New Hot Water Heater

10/22/2018 (Permalink)

You have likely already read our blog on how to remove a hot water heater so now we will discuss how to install your new hot water heater. When purchasing a new tank be sure to use something similar to the pre-existing tank as far as being an electric or gas tank.

  1. Start by positioning the new tank in the area where it will rest. Maneuver the tank to an orientation where all the wiring and pipes can easily be attached. Also keep in mind that the tank has cover plates that need to be accessible during any future maintenance so keep these visible.
  2. Wrap any threaded pipe fittings with two or three layers of teflon plumbers’ tape then re-install the water pipes. When applying the tape, start at about 1" from the end of the fitting and wrap the tape in a clockwise manner around the pipe, overlapping at least 1/2 with each rotation. The entire threaded area of the pipe should be covered with two layers of tape.
  3. Connect and tighten all pipes with a wrench. (DO not over tighten).
  4. Turn on the water and check for any leaks. Wipe all joints dry and check again after several minutes for any leaks. To eliminate air in the tank and plumbing allow the hot water tap to run until it stops sputtering.
  5. When the tank is filled turn on the power (if electric) or connect the gas supply line (if gas). Test the gas line for leaks. Recommended temperature is 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This will take several hours to reach.

Hot to Remove a Hot Water Heater

10/9/2018 (Permalink)

Hot water heater leaks are a fairly common cause of water damages that we deal with. Some homeowners use a plumber to handle the removal and replacement of their hot water heater but if you are the DIY type it is simple enough for one to do it on their own. Some tips you should know before starting is that you may need a hand when removing the heat due to its size. Even after it is drained it is still not light and very bulky. You should also keep in mind that you will not have water available for use for a couple hours during this process. 

1. Turn all water/energy sources off!

Start by turning off the water supply to the hot water heater whether that is the main valve to the house or a shut off valve directly to the heater. Turn off the power to the heater at the panel board as well as the gas supply. 

2. Remove any insulation around the tank and save to reuse if still in good condition.

3. Drain the tank. At the bottom of the tank there should be a valve that will allow you to attach a garden hose. Once attached have the other end outside to allow water to be drained. 

4. Open both hot and cold water valves somewhere in the house.

5. Time to disconnect the tank.

If you have an electric HWH- there top should have a small steel plate where the wires enter the tank. Remove the plate and gently pull the wires out. For a gas HWH- remove all connections to gas piping. 

6. Take a wrench and disconnect the water pipe. You may have to carefully bend this flexible pipe out of the way to remove the tank. It is normal for some extra water to leak at this point. However if it is more than a cup worth the water has not been shut off. 

7. Remove the tank and set aside for discard. 

Be on the lookout for our next blog on how to install a new hot water heater!

Why Keeping Inventory is Important

9/14/2018 (Permalink)

How to Properly Purchase Contents Insurance

Have you ever asked yourself, "how much coverage do I really need on my belongings?" There is no way to just guess and hope you have enough without keeping an inventory of what you have. Not only for the purpose of determining how much coverage you will need but also in the event of a loss where those items become damaged and that policy comes into effect.

When setting up your home or business insurance policy it is important to keep an inventory of your personal belongings or products/merchandise. Whether you are dealing with personal or business items the same guidelines follow. Keeping a list of items along with the value of them will help keep you prepared when a disaster strikes. It is also important to keep this list current with any new purchases that may increase the value of your property. Trust me, it will be less of a hassle than having to figure out what items you own when they are possibly damaged by a disaster such as a fire. With all the stress and amount of effort one deals with after property damage, one less thing to worry about will help the restoration process resolve much quicker and easier for the owner.  

Also, aside from the usual items like furniture and jewelry; it is important to keep copies of any important documents. Things like birth certificates, property deeds and business contracts should be kept safe with duplicates available along with electronic copies. 

Once you have an idea of everything you own and its value this will allow you to confirm you are receiving enough coverage for those items in your insurance policy. Every insurance policy has a limit for reimbursement so knowing how your policy matches up will keep any surprises down the road from surfacing. 

Can Living With Mold Affect Your Health

6/14/2018 (Permalink)

The topic on health hazards from mold exposure is a gray area. It is believed that living with high levels of mold can cause some minor and/or serious health affects. However, there is very little evidence to confirm all instances at this time. 

What most can agree on is living with mold should not be ignored. Not only due to the beliefs of the health risks accompanied but the affects it may cause to the value of your home. Any new buyer or renter will not want to walk into another person's mold issue. 

Mold comes in thousands of different strains but only a few of those produce toxins. The most well known being stachybotrys chartarum also known as "black mold". Did you know the term we hear often as "toxic black mold" is not actually a scientific term. It was created by news reporters that carried the term around to create the myth that "toxic black mold" is deadly which in reality that has not been proven. 

Now lets discuss what types of symptoms are reported due to mold exposure. People who spend time in these environments report respiratory issues such as shortness of breath, development of asthma, coughing, wheezing, eye irritation, nasal congestion and throat irritation. It is believed that those with weakened immune systems or a history of allergies or asthma are more prone to adverse reactions from mold. There are also some people that are more sensitive to particular strains of mold that can vary from person to person.  

The CDC suggested a link between mold and a medical condition called acute idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage (AIPH) or pulmonary hemosiderosis. Others state that mold causes more serious conditions as well like lung disease, upper respiratory infections or even cancer. These claims have yet to be proven with any substantial evidence. 

Although the research is limited on proving many of these claims it should still not keep someone from treating and removing any mold growth in their home. Hopefully future research can provide more insight so that federal laws can help regulate mold in homes. 

What is Not Covered?

6/13/2018 (Permalink)

Here are a few key areas that are typically not covered by your standard insurance policy. Also keep in mind of a deductible that may need to be met or coverage limits. 


1. Damages resulting from unresolved maintenance issues or neglecting to repair source. For instance, you have a leak coming from your toilet supply line that you have just been ignoring for almost a year. It caused some water damage to the ceiling below which typically would be covered by your policy initially but waiting too long to fix the problem will likely cause your insurance to reject coverage. 

2. Flood. Any source of water that enters your home from a flood regardless of the cause is not covered under a standard insurance policy. Yet you may purchase flood insurance which would be recommended for those living in a flood prone area. 

3. Law or Ordinance Upgrades. This type of scenario can come into play for something like a fire that causes the electrical wiring in your home to need to be removed and replaced. Yet, your town has new building codes that require a more expensive upgrade to new wiring being installed. In this case your insurance will only cover the costs of the original old wiring and the difference in charges for the new upgrade will be your responsibility. 

4. Sewer or drain back up from OUTSIDE. You will typically not be coverage for water that backs up into your home from an outside source. There are endorsements that can be added on to your policy to cover backs up occurring within your property line. If the source is coming outside of your property line your city may be responsible. 

5. Costs to repair and/or replace source. Most insurance companies will cover the damages associated however the costs to repair the cause falls under the homeowner. For example a pipe bursts in your home causing damages to your hardwood floors. Your insurance company will take care of fixing the floors yet the plumber you hired to replace the pipe will come out of your pocket. 

Emergency Ready Profile

6/8/2018 (Permalink)

The Best Way to Reduce Business Interruption Following a Disaster is to Plan For it NOW.

As many as 50% of businesses may never recover following a disaster, according to the latest industry research. 

SERVPRO of Paramus offers a FREE assessment of your property and develops a plan in the event of a disaster. 

Why the SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile?

Here are just a few reasons why your business will benefit from having an emergency ready profile in place. 

  • A no cost assessment of your facility. – This means there is no need to allocate funds, giving you a great value at no cost.
  • A concise Profile Document that contains only the critical information needed in the event of an emergency. – It will only take a little time to complete and will not take you away from current projects. But it will save a lot of time if ever needed.
  • A guide to help you get back into your building following a disaster. – This can help minimize the amount of time your business is inactive by having an immediate plan of action.
  • Establishes your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professional as your disaster mitigation and restoration provider. – You have a provider that is recognized as an industry leader and close by.
  • Identification of the line of command for authorizing work to begin. – This saves time so we can begin the work of mitigating the damage which can save you time and money.
  • Provides facility details such as shut-off valve locations, priority areas and priority contact information. – Having a quick reference of what to do, how to do it and who to call provides solutions in a disaster.
  • A concise Profile Document that contains only the critical information needed in the event of an emergency.

Developing your Emergency Ready Profile (ERP) will only take a little time to complete and will not take you away from your current projects.

The SERVPRO Emergency Ready Profile (ERP) could be a valuable tool to help restore your business in the shortest amount of time possible.

To set up this free service, call Tony D'Arco @ SERVPRO of Paramus. 

Top Sources of Mold

5/30/2018 (Permalink)

We will be discussing the primary sources of mold that are commonly found in homes. As we all know mold needs moisture and food (porous materials) to grow. Mold also likes dark humid environments. Some key causes to look out for mold are:

1. Leaky Appliances

Daily wear and tear to your appliances can cause leaks or splits that can allow moisture to escape. Unfortunately most appliances have the pipes and hoses hidden out of sight running inside walls or cabinets. So it may take some digging around to find any leaks. We recommend checking regularly for loose washers or leaky hoses. 

2. Air Conditioning Units

The condensation from an air conditioning unit creates moisture for mold. On top of that it also sucks in air from the outside that contains dirt and pollen which are attractive materials for mold. You can help minimize mold growth by running it everyday for at least 10 minutes. When it sits for long periods of time it is more likely to grow mold. When not in use like during winter season you should remove it and store in a dry place. 

3. Water Intrusion

It is beneficial to check your ceilings and cracks of your windows for any water getting in. This can be a sign of poor building construction so you may need a professional to diagnose and treat the issue. 

4. Window Sills

This area is subject to higher levels of moisture and humidity along with dirt that is a valuable source for mold. 

Next, we will discuss some locations in your home that have a higher chance for mold to grow.

1. Basement

Being that most basements are located on a sub-level, moisture is constantly part of its environment. The humidity level is much higher and typically not well ventilated leaving humidity to linger longer. Any cracks in foundation can also add to the issue. 

2. Wallpaper

If wallpaper is peeling it is likely that it has mold growing behind it. 

3. Attic

The attic of a home is home to many air flow sources like dryer vents, plumbing vents, and kitchen/bathroom. All of these constantly pump moist air into the attic accompanied with all the inevitable dust found there makes a perfect environment for mold. 

4. Crawlspace

Like a basement the crawlspace also has a higher relative humidity. The soil in the crawlspace will absorb and lock in moisture and when it dries it will evaporate adding moisture to the air. 

What To Do Until SERVPRO Arrives

5/30/2018 (Permalink)

When you experience a water damage the quicker you tackle it the better the outcome. First and foremost, finding out the source and stopping it should be your main priority.

If there are no safety hazards begin by shutting off the water source at the shut off valve. If applicable contact a plumber to fix the source to keep further damage from re-occurring. 

If the water did not come from a clean source and likely contaminated avoid all wet areas. 

DO

- Contact your homeowners insurance company

- Contact a professional restoration company (SERVPRO of Paramus @ 201-445-5588)

- If safe, turn off electricity to affected areas at circuit breaker

- Try to mop or blot up water with towels

- Place furniture legs on foil on wooden blocks

- Use safety pins or clothespins to keep furniture skirts and drapery off wet floors

- Remove oriental rugs and place in a dry area

- Remove all moisture sensitive items to a dry place

- Prop up any wet upholstery cushions to dry

- Remove books, magazines, paper to a dry place where they will not transfer and stain

- Wipe excess moisture from furniture

DO NOT

- Use a household vacuum to remove water

- Use any electronics in a room with wet flooring

- Use ceiling fans where a wet ceiling is present

- Open windows in temperatures higher than 70 degrees. AC may be used if water is not contaminated.  

Generator Safety

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Generator Safety A generator being used after a house fire in Rutherford, NJ.

When a storm hits and your home loses power many people turn to a portable generator. Although generators may seem simple enough to use many people do not know the risks of operating one. 

Using a generator indoors can kill you in minutes. The primary hazard is the likelihood of carbon monoxide poisoning from the toxic engine exhaust. Carbon monoxide does not produce an odor and is invisible to the eye. That is why it is important to practice safe handling. 

1. NEVER use a generator indoors including a garage (even with an open door). The best and only place you should place an operating generator is outdoors. Allow 5 feet of clearance around the generator. Be sure the generator exhaust fumes are away from all windows and doors to prevent travel indoors. 

2. Install carbon monoxide alarms in your home. Follow the manufacturers guidelines for correct placement and mounting height.

3. Avoid electric shock or electrocution by keeping the generator dry. Do not use in rain or wet conditions. 

4. When refueling be sure to turn off the generator and allow to cool. Spilled gasoline on the hot engine parts can ignite causing an explosion. Do not overfill tank! Leave room of fuel expansion. 

5. Never smoke near a generator. 

6. Know the output rating of your generator. To prevent overloading select the right sized generator to handle the power requirements of your appliances you wish to use. Overloading can destroy not only the generator but also your electronics and/or appliances. 

7. Never plug directly to your homes wiring or household outlets. Plug appliances directly into the generator or use a heavy duty outdoor extension cord with the correct outage to handle your appliances. Never use a cord with exposed wiring. 

STORAGE

Storage of fuel safely is just as important as operation of the generator. Store fuel outside living areas, such as a locked shed, in a properly labeled approved safety can. Use the fuel recommended in instructions for your generator. Some areas restrict the amount of fuel you may store so be sure to verify with your local fire dept. Do not store fuel near a fuel burning appliance like a natural gas water heater. 

Practice proper generator handling to keep your home & family safe!

Why Bleach Is Not Recommended for Mold

5/29/2018 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Why Bleach Is Not Recommended for Mold Mold Growth on Sheetrock

Did you know that bleach does not actually get rid of your mold problem?  The old school thought of spraying bleach whenever you see mold is nothing but a myth. The reason people believe this works is because to the naked eye the visible mold is gone, yes, but that is because the bleach has removed the color of mold not its roots.  

The OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) stopped recommending the use of bleach for dealing with mold problems. The ESA (Environmental Site Assessment) also updated their guide similarly as well. 

The problem with bleach is that it is has too many variables that affect how it can treat mold. Bleach only works on killing mold on non-porous materials. If you read our previous blog on how mold growth occurs you will know that mold typically grows on porous materials like drywall and wood. So the chances your mold growth will be on a hard surface is unlikely anyways. 

Using bleach to clean areas like wood can actually promote mold growth and can leave you with a bigger problem than when you originally started. This is because mold spreads its roots deep into porous surfaces. When you use bleach it creates excessive moisture which then creates a better environment for the mold to return and thrive. Bleach will also negatively affect materials like wood by breaking down its fibers. It can also cause corrosion to metals. 

Bleach contains an ingredient called Sodium Hypochlorite which in high concentrations can be registered as an antimicrobial pesticide that will kill mold under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. However Sodium Hypochlorite can also be sold as a household cleaner without being registered as a pesticide due to this type of item only containing small amounts of Sodium Hypochlorite. This means it is not guaranteed to kill mold nor is it sold for that purpose. 

We want to steer you away from thinking bleach is the best route to dealing with your mold. Not only is it not effective but the dangerous fumes are toxic to your health. Plus, there are many  anti-microbial alternatives readily available that will get the job done and are safer to use. 

If you are dealing with mold in your home it is recommended to contact a professional. We are available to answer your mold questions. Contact us today @ 201-445-5588.